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years and has already, i know, improved training techniques. >> michael skerker is a professor at the u.s. naval academy, and he is the author of this book, "an ethics of interrogation." here it is. this is book tv at the u.s. naval academy. >> is there a nonfiction of your book you would like to see featured on book tv? send us an e-mail. or tweet us. talks about the history of the office of strategic services in china and the successes and failures the organization had. this interview, recorded at the u.s. naval academy in annapolis, md., was a part of the book tv college series and is about 20 minutes. >> on your screen, a professor at the u.s. naval academy, also the author of this book, al ss in china, a prelude to a cold war. professor, if you would, start by briefly describing china's role in world war ii. >> china's role in world war ii is very complex. first of all, china entered the war first. most people in china would agree that china entered the world were to way back in 1937, july july 1937 with china and japan went to full-scale war. that fact, of course gile was not recogn
historian of u.s. health care systems. [inaudible] very busy during the political season, beatrix, debate about what is best in health care, what is best in health care insurance, what is best for women's health care rights being in the air, everywhere you look these days. so as a -- [inaudible] and ak keepic in women history, i'm sure all of us are looking forward to the presentation. thank you for being here. you couldn't be in a better time for this talk either. such much of grand rap pieds has been very highly invested in the health care industry. hoping to develop seller health education, research, innovation in practice, all in the quest for great health care here. i hope some of the visitors to town will be able to see what we call health bill on michigan so much of the investment in medical health-related work has been made. dr. hoffman is professor and chair and department of history at northern illinois. dekalb illinois. she completed her ph.d. as it seems everyone at my table did at rutgerss university in 1996. she's written expleasantively on the american health care reform in
beatrix hoffman to you. she is a leading historian of u.s. health care systems. i bet you have been very busy during this political season, beatrix, with the debate about what's best in health care, what's best in health care insurance, what's best for women's health care rights being in the air everywhere you look these days. so as a person addicted both the politics and in academic and women's history, i come and i'm sure all of us, are really looking forward to your presentation, so thanks for being here. you couldn't be any better town for this talk either. since much of grand rapids including grand valley state has been very highly invested in the health care industry, hoping to develop stellar health care education, research, innovation and practice are all on the quest for great health care. i hope some of the visitors to town will be able to see what we call health care in michigan where so much of investment in medical health related work has been made. doctor hoffman is professor and chair of the department of history at northern illinois. she completed her ph.d as it seems at
a chance to talk with professors who are also authors, and today we are at the u.s. naval academy in annapolis to maryland. joining us is the author of this book, michael skerker, an ethics of interrogation is the name of the book published by the university of chicago press. professor, first of all, what do you do at the naval academy? >> i am an ethicist. to see at this glass that all the answers have to take in some upper levels las, religiousyy studies and that they courses. >> would you say your book is a philosophical book or a how to interrogate book? >> it is a work of philosophy. the principal question is under what circumstances can a statey ask more demand to know the secrets of its citizens.y there are some practical dos and don'ts as well. >> what is the geneva convention that we always talk about? >> the geneva convention to protect pow's signed in 1948. >> and how did that come about? what will does it play inyyy interrogation?yyyyyyy >> sure.yyyyyyyy throughout much of the historyy of warfare, prisoners-of-waryy were treated at the mercy
. this is an important point because consumer and consumer spending make up two-thirds of the u.s. economy. >>> what will a second term for president obama mean to the economy? will we see compromise or fall over the fiscal cliff? joining me are two former top presidential advisers. laura tyson, chair of the economic advisers then for president clinton and marty feldstein who held the same title under president reagan. laura, marty great to have you on the program. thank you for spending the time today. >> thank you. >> good to be with you. >> marty, both sides appear to be extending an olive branch when with it comes to the fiscal cliff. do you think we will reach a compromise? and if so how and when? >> i hope so. the consequence of not reaching the compromise for the american and world economy next year would be disastrous. we would be talking about a very deep recession if we went over the cliff and didn't quickly bounce back from it. >> laura, you think there is a two-part solution. what do you mean by that? >> we have the fiscal cliff and a need to get a long-run compromise plan on deficit red
cutting ceremony. >>> more now on the downfall of the now former cia director david petraeus. u.s. government official is telling cnn the affair that caused petraeus' stepdown was first revealed through an fbi investigation. suzanne kelly has more now. suzanne? >> we now know from a u.s. official it was a complaint that paula broadwell, the woman who wrote the biography of general peatry was was sending harassing e-mails to another woman that prompted the fbi to investigate. also we know from that source that the investigation led to the discovery of e-mails between broadwell and petraeus that indicated the affair. that second woman hasn't been identified and the official we spoke with didn't know the nature of that woman's relationship with the former director. but more details are coming out about the time line of events and when u.s. officials were notified of the circumstances of this investigation. senior u.s. intelligence official tells cnn the fbi informed the director of national intelligence, james clapper, about the investigation on tuesday night, election night, just as
work for the u.s. central command. petraeus headed the central command from late 2008 to mid 2010. and during that time presented kelley and her husband an award for raising money to pay for junior enlisted men and women to attend military balls. petraeus has told friends that he had no romantic involvement with kelley. and only saw her when she was with her husband. law enforcement officials say they found no evidence to refute that. and described kelley as a victim who received and messages.threatening some close to petraeus say he's told them the affair with broadwell began about two months after he took over the central intelligence agency in september 2011. and the affair ended about four months ago. friends of petraeus say he described the trust with broadwell as infrequent and he say he never pursued her after the affair ended. now law enforcement officials stress to us that kelley is in no trouble at all. in fact no one is roicly to face any criminal charges here. the fbi investigation in the end found only a personal affair and no concerns about national security. jses bo
is talking about. welcome to "the willis report." ♪ ♪ gerri: welcome everybody, i am gerri willis. the u.s. dangling over the fiscal cliff. washington can't get its act together. speaker boehner challenging president obama to lead us. his first comments on the economy sense reelection, he seems emboldened by his reelection. with more on this, chris stirewalt. it is great to have you here. i want to start by talking about what the president had to say today. he seemed pretty firm on what he said so far about what we need to do with taxes in this country. here is the president. >> i am open to compromise. i am open to new ideas. i am committed to solving our fiscal challenges. but i refuse to accept any approach that is not balanced. i am not going to ask students and seniors and middle-class families to pay down the entire deficit while people like me, making over $250,000 are not asked to pay a dime more in tas. [applause] gerri: chris, jay carney comes out a few minutes later and he says, well, the president says he will raise taxes on wealthy. so where is the compromise? >> the hope is t
is the new big task facing barack obama and the u.s. congress. gridlock over the so-called fiscal cliff. what's the fiscal or better put financial cliff? think of it as a high, steep rock. a ledge the u.s. is teetering on and will plunge over if no action is taken on certain financial matters. what are those? one, the bush era tax cuts. in 2001 and 2003, congress, under president george w. bush, lowered everyone's taxes. but it was only temporary, like 11 years temporary. less than two months from now midnight december 31, taxes go back up. the average household will pay more in taxes each year, $2000 to $3500 more. two, sequestration. what's that? new, big budget cuts. $110 billion in cuts in 2013 alone. they go into effect january 2, and will affect the defense budget and the domestic budget. the cbo, says unemployment could climb up over 9%, pushing the u.s. back into recession. why did this happen? an automatic sequestration or permanent set aside of $1.2 trillion was passed by congress, in order to force congress to compromise and figure out how to cut the budget itself. but, a congressi
. it cannot be business as usual asiran in the year it was written about the way the u.s. government organized itself at that level to deal with the reactor in syria. the bush administration organized its iraq policy in another way. there are several models out there but it is important that i ran not be seen as one of 10 or 15 problems we have to deal with on a daily basis. iran is problem number one and will be for awhile. there are plenty of other problems in the middle east. first, syria -- i concur with everything dennis said. first of all, for the longest time, many people thought the fall of assad was inevitable so we would not have to do that much to provoke it. i'm not so sure, not because i don't think this insurgency is effected. i have been on the receiving end of a number of insurgencies in my career is. this is a very powerful and effective one. iran has command -- has committed -- syria has committed powerful friends that appear to be ready to go to the mat to make sure the assad regime will stay in power. that is russia and iran. the result could be an assad that stays in power
of history at the u.s. table academy. author of several books, including his most recent, american sheikhs, to families,j) for generations, and the storyk) of americj)a's influence in then middle east. who was dana? >> the founder of what later became the american university of beirut. >> added he go about doing that? >> a lot of american entrepreneur real spirit. >> made the family quite wealthy. >> what was his goal in founding the american university? >> his initial goal differ from a became his life's work. he arrived in the middle east and 1850's determined to convert muslims to christianity and very quickly realized that wasn't going to happen and that's the way to make a connection was not to convert them, but to educate them and to improve their lives and tangible, concrete ways because that is with they responded to positively. once he had that in sight he ran with it and develop what they became the harvard of the middle east. >> is is still open? >> it is time indeed. weathered many tough years. it remains open and stay that way even through the tough times of the civil war. >>
the affair and a possible security breach in october after the investigation had begun. a u.s. official says the communications were never compromised and he was never the target of the investigation. another issue, petraeus stepped down days before he was supposed to testify before a senate committee about the attack on the u.s. consulate in libya. acting cia director michael morell will testify instead but some republicans weren't pleased. >> at the end of the day, the one thing that has to happen in my view is we need to get to the bottom of benghazi. i don't see how in the world find out what happened in benghazi before, during, and after the attack if petraeus doesn't testify. >> cnn has not been able to reach broadwell for comment. now, the woman who alergely received those e-mails has been identifies publicly and, of course, still questions remain over just what those e-mails contain, fredricka. >> what can more can you tell us about paula broadwell and how they met general petraeus. >> she is a married woman of two and she met him and started researching this disser tags that later t
complained to fbi agents about being harassed by paula broadwell, david petraeus's biography. a senior u.s. military official says jill kelly is involved in wounded warrior fund-raising in tampa, is married, she and her husband are close family friends. officials say petraeus's downfall started when kelly complained to the fbi that she was receiving intimidated e-mails from broadwell. law enforcement and multiple u.s. officials tell nbc news that those e-mails led to the discovery of others between general petraeus and broadwell and were indicative of an extramarital affair. a senior law enforcement official told nbc news that fbi agents interviewed general petraeus in late october and concluded there was no criminal violation. today, members of congress are asking why the fbi did not inform them or the president sooner. >> we received no advanced notice. it was like a lightning bolt. i mean, this is something that could have had an effect on national security. i think we should have been told. there is a way to do it. >> reporter: this comes as we are learning more about the days leading
. >> next, the ethics of embedded >> after that a look at the changes in the u.s. senate following tuesday elections. >> recent thri museum of jewish heritage in new york city hosted a conversation on the role of embedded jurne lists. they discuss their role as journalists in iraq afghanistan and columbia. this is about 50 minutes. >> thank you for the introductions. i would like to thank you in advance. we are talking about the ethics of journalists. i am not a journalist. i am a historian. what you guys call this? do you refer to being embedded as -- how do we talk about this? >> an embed means -- you could be with the military and not be embedded. i signed a contract with the military. as far as i know, this is pretty much invented by the military and all this terminology, before that, you would just say, i am reporting with the army. >> there is an indication with embedded that you are living with them and you have shelter, food, and are with them. >> you can rely on them for food and security. we only refer to embeds as far as the military. >> it is about journalists who are working d
administration had against him, had tried against him. because syria was -- opposed the u.s. led invasion of iraq in 2003. the syrian government was looking the other way or even supporting jihaddists who were entering into iraq and killing american and allies forces. so the u.s. and syria were on opposite sides of the street, to say the least. he survived that. he survived the association with the assassination of former lebanese prime minister in february of 2005, in a damning un report that was leaked that held syria responsible. he survived all that and actually emerged in somewhat flying colors by 2008-2009, accepted back into the regional order, into the international community, even representatives at an anational plows meeting to jump start the arab-israeli peace talk. so i think he developed a sense of survivalism. he and his supporters. to the point where, when you have another challenge, and the most serious to date, obviously, since march 2011 and continuing today, that sense of triumphantism, that they're on the right side of history, sense of destiny, and i sincerely believe if i ta
ramping up to 2003 the afghanistan invasion, the u.s. troops on the special groundwork special forces. it was such a small force. the issue really came up again in 2002 as people were preparing to embed in iraq. i heard about it and many of my peers already in the field thought, no way, we will not do that. our impression of the 1991 embeds is that they were stuck in a room and could not get anything done. a lot of us chose not to embed and many of us went to iraq into the north. i would say we were shocked and appalled at how much play the embedded reporters were getting. there were good stories being reported. they were reported well. it worked so well i felt like i was worried news organizations would start just sending embeds and not reporting the other side. class with the security system, a basically became like that. with iraq, it got to the point where you could not be in unilateral anymore. in afghanistan, that is typical. >> that is the term for non-embedded. unilateralist. >> you are unilateral. >> what was important for me in the iraq war was working for the l.a. times we
, go ahead. >> in 2008 the u.s. government was borrowing 20 cents on the dollar and now 40 cents on the dollar just to cover the overhead costs bause they've expanded that much and typically it's 20% of gdp. gary b is right, 24 plus% and growing, it's taking over more of the gdp. therefore you can have the federal government hire everybody, but let's be honest how are you going to pay everybody if you don't have the private sector funding. >> but, also, businesses looking at the expanded debt and they say listen, we know how to do math. and someone's going to pay for it and it's going to be higher taxes and higher taxes is lower profit and that's how it works. >> do you think that caterpillar is making a call based on potential future policy? i think you're short-- what they are saying is foreign governments and their demand is what's falling off right now. the rest of the world is much-- >> right. >> because they were shrinking their economies a little too early in the recession and too quick into austerity and california is america's greatest economy, let's not forget that, muc
to having an extramarital affair. now we know from a u.s. official that the affair came to light during an investigation into e-mails sent by petraeus's biographer paula broadwell. we also have a better timeline. james clapper was informed tuesday evening. the president was told thursday, hours before his face-to-face meeting with general petraeus. there are still questions about why congressional leaders weren't told until friday. but let's get back to general petraeus. an official tells cnn that james clapper encouraged petraeus to step down after learning of the affair. joining me now is rejeve from "the washington post." good morning to you. do you think general would have step dound if clapper hadn't suggested it? >> good morning, randi. i think pe tratraeus faced withs investigation, faced with officials understanding what has occurred between him and his biographer paula broadwell was left with little choice. with everything i know, i think that resignation would have been something he likely would have suggested himself as well. >> you have written quite a bit about petraeus. ho
for the white house. congress set to hold hearings on the attack in benghazi. a new pentagon report shows top u.s. military officials were not told about the assault for nearly an hour and special operations forces were delayed many hours. new questions over whether petraeus will testify. >> john bolton, former embassador to the united nations joins us. good morning, embassador. >> good morning. >> do you buy this timeline about petraeus, that he resigned after the election and no one knew a thing until this came out? >> no, it's simply not credible. i speak in part not just as a state department alumnus but the justice department too. i can't believe if the f.b.i. investigating the c.i.a., to agencies who have no love loss between them, the f.b.i. uncovered possible problems with communications from the c.i.a.'s director, i have to believe that the director of the f.b.i. would have been informed of this in a matter of nanoseconds and i would be sunday if the f.b.i. director did not immediately talk to the attorney general as soon as he learned about this potential problem. and i then find it har
brought this to light. >> we now know from a u.s. official that it was a complaint from paula broadwell was sending harassing e-mails to another woman close to the cia director that prompted the fbi to investigate. also we know that the investigation led to the discovery of e-mails between broadwell and petraeus that indicated the affair. now, that second woman hasn't been identified, and the official we spoke with didn't know the nature of that woman's relationship with the former director. but more details are. going out about the timeline of events and when u.s. officials were notified of the circumstances of this investigation. a senior u.s. intelligence official tells the cnn that the fbi informed the director of national intelligence james clapper about the investigation on tuesday night, election night, just as some polls were beginning to close and director clapper as a friending colleague, fellow officer, and admirer, urged petraeus to step down from his position. we know as well from that intelligence source that director clapper informed the white house on wednesday and then,
. a u.s. officials say the fbi had a tap he may have been involved with viagra for, pola broad well. the woman you see on the screen. she could have possibly had access to his e-mail account. also, there is continuing anger, frustration and despair as people demand to know why there neighborhood remain start from 12 days after super storm sandy hit the boardwalk community. >> i cannot get light on or anything for my kids i can not get power, heat, garbage pickup. >> workers from the long island power authority are visible but still cannot seem to get the electricity back and homes in the flood zone. york's governor has threatened to pull the company's operating license. >> we paid them, and we gave them a franchise because they represent themselves as experts at doing this and they failed. they should be held accountable for their action. kenneth gonzales, a registered nurse is crammed into his living room he once shares with his three other people roommates and belongings they have. >> if someone comes in here with guns to take it a little i have left what am i supposed to do? they
the panel and we'll see you the reception. >> next a look at the changes in the u.s. senate following tuesday elections. then the president obama obama and speaker bainer and then the polling during the 2012 presidential campaign. >> tomorrow president obama will be at arlington national cemetery to participate in the ceremony at the tom of the unknown and a remembrance ceremony. live coverage begins at 11:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> 2013 should be the year we solve our debt reform. i'm proposing we avert the fiscal cliff and 2013 is finally the year our government comes to grips with the problems that are facing us. >> i'm open to compromise and new ideas. i'm committed to solving our fiscal challenge. but i refuse to accept any approach that isn't balanced. i'm not going to ask students and seniors and middle class families to pay down the entire deficit while people like me aren't asked to pay a dime more in taxes. >> the new elected congress starts in january but the congress has to do work in a lame duck session and they have to work on the federal deficit raising the debt ceil
as he continues to that 2014 deadline for u.s. troops out of the afghanistan. the ceremonies get under way later this morning we'll have live coverage at 11:00 eastern here on c-span. washington journal continues on this sunday november 11. we'll be back in a moment. >> some patients require special therapy, hip knows sis is effect nive certain types of battle northeast rose sis f. >> now you're deep asleep. we're going back now, going back to -- one of the most important procedures is group psychotherapy. here under the psych tryst guidance the patient lerns to understand something of the basis causes of his distress. >> i'd like to see if we can get some illustrations about how one's personal safety would stem from childhood safety. if i had done anything wrong afseshamed of i would tell them what i had done so i kept it to myself. >> this weekend on c-span 3 let there be light. his world war ii dk meantry on combat trauma and treatment. today at 4 p.m. eastern. >> i want my fiction to be intensely journalistic because unless you get out and look at what is going on these days, you'r
petraeus possible affair and possible security breach in october after the investigation began. a u.s. official says the general's communications were never compromised and he was never the target of the investigation. another issue, petraeus stepped down days before he was supposed to testify before a senate committee about the attack on the u.s. consulate in libya. micha micha michael morell will testify instead. >> we've got to get to the bottom of benghazi. i don't see how in the world you can find out what happened in benghazi before, during, and after the attack if general petraeus doesn't testify. >> reporter: cnn has not been able to reach broadwell for comment. now, the woman who allegedly received those harassing e-mails from broadwell hasn't been identified publicly and, of course, questions still remain about just what those e-mails contain. fred? >> what more can you tell us about paula broadwell. >> reporter: we know that she's a married mother of two, lives in charlotte, north carolina, and first met general petraeus back in 2006 when he came to harvard's kennedy school
of month of 1918. germany and the u.s. that ended the war. millions of veterans later we attempt to honor the lives of who helped. >> good morning. a relatively quiet morning along market street. at least for now some people are getting out and about. however, that is expected to change with 11:00 a.m. the starting time. this staging for the parade is right behind me. veterans, organizers will start in getting everything ready. it takes off from here. market street/second street. they will go west, towards civic center plaza is similar to the san francisco giants parade. just a couple of weeks ago. it is scheduled to last until 3:00 p.m. and a salute to veterans that have also served in the middle east. afghanistan and iraq. half some public view the lines are impacted, so if you're going to be coming out here please do some research and plan ahead are going to be lots of people out with road closures and that sort of thing. or if you would like to avoid this altogether but there is still plenty of room along market street. if you're going to come down is much easier to get a spot instead
be honing in on. as well as you know, this year's conference is galvanized around a set of issues u.s. national security, six topic issues for the president in 2013. and let me just recap those for you because we want to drill down in these. the council selected u.s. economic competitiveness, u.s. education competing globally. the middle east, china, afghanistan, pakistan and u.s. energy policy as the six top issues. starting with that. looking at its strategically, do you feel that those are the core issues before president obama and this administration and our country going into 2013? if not, what would you change? what would you add? >> when i was informed by lori murray about the outcome of the process by which the world affairs council went through and came up with those six issues, i thought you had it exactly right. i think those are the big issues and congratulations to you. i think you had them just right. i think there's an overarching issue on top of all of them in some sense enables all of them. and that is if you look at the national security challenges and foreign policy
the u.s. attorneys to go out into the attorney to talk to the communities in our district to understand what the issues are and challenges are and to do what we can to help, to convene meetings, to do whatever we can to help on behalf of the administration. and as part of that i welcomed that request that the attorney general made of us and the president made of us and as a result i've gone out into my community and my district goes from the oregon border to monteray, and i've met with all kinds of different people. we have 33 indian tribes in the northern district of california, most people don't know, and i've met with those people. i've met with the muslim community, with the siekh american community, with the lgbq community, with the human rights commission in san francisco, all kinds of people, and we talk about all kinds of things. we talk about things that are more common to the u.s. attorney. we talk about fraud and identify theft and hate crimes and civil rights issue and there's one thing that comes up in absolutely every conversation that i have had with people in the dis
about my background. i am a naturalized u.s. citizen. i was born in ecuador. i came to the bay area, went to stanford university, and have a master's degree in structural engineering which i obtained in 1981, started my own structural engineering firm in 1988, santos and urrutia engineers. my partner is somebody that i met at stanford university. albert is a native san franciscan that attended the san francisco community college. there is a program where if you take 28 units and you get 3.65 and above, you have a direct path to uc-berkeley for better, stanford. [laughter] i forgot this was being televised. [laughter] i met albert and we started the firm in 1988. that is 25 years ago. we employed over 25 people. quite a few of them, members of this city college. let me tell you, we hear a lot of negative things about the community college. but i must assure you, that in terms of technical expertise and great educators, we have absolutely the best teachers in the nation. [applause] i can guarantee you we will be preserving them. i have, behind me, my wonderful family, my wife jenny, m
attack and the u.s. diplomatic mission in benghazi, libya. nbc news has confirmed petraeus conducted his own investigation on the ground. >> i don't see how in the world you can find out what happened in benghazi before, during, and after the attack if general petraeus doesn't testify. >> reporter: still trusted by many in washington, petraeus is in a unique position to shed light on benghazi. even as he rides out a controversy of his own. top lawmakers here are demanding more information on that investigation and why they weren't briefed on it until the general resigned. brian moore, nbc news, washington. >> for now acting cia director michael morell is set to testify about the benghazi attack on capitol hill, but on "meet the press" this morning "washington post's" bob woodward talked about the possibility of general petraeus still being called to testify. >> it is not going away and the question will be, i suspect, will he be asked to testify as a private citizen either in closed door, probably only petraeus -- if he has the ability to stop this benghazi frenzy. >> congressional heari
shows the first u.s. military unit arrived in libya more than 14 hours after the attack on our consulate was over. too late to help our ambassador and three other america killed in the september 11th attack. my guest now says the administration is in danger in the life and liberty of americans, including those killed in an gauzy by ignoring sharia law. joining me now, andrew boston, the author of the new book, sharia versus freedom, the legacy of islamic totalitarianism. it is great to have you with us. we appreciate it. let's start with, first, the idea that sharia law, a lot f people this message saying it is a cultural aspect of the islamic life that poses no threat to erica. your thoughts. >> sharia is really foundational in islamic societies. it is derived from the text of islam, the traditions of mohammad demanded has many ritual aspects that might be similar to other religions demand but it is also an entire political system. and here is where it runs afoul of modern human rights concepts like our bill of rights, the universal declaration of human rights. it includes a timeless wa
." david walker spent a decade overseeing the federal government, how it spends your tax dollars as the u.s. comptroller general. today he's the ceo of comeback america and he's a deficit hawk. the ceo of pimco. hisfirm is one of the largest investors of bonds, and steve moore is a conservative, founder of club for growth and a writer at the wall street journal. i'm going to start with you, steven, my good friend. the fiscal cliff is an immediate threat. both parties need to come together to fix it, because not fixing it would set even fiscal conservatives back, don't you agree? >> yeah, and i think other conservatives agree that he don't want to go off this fiscal cliff, either. i think one hangup that will start on tuesday is the president will say, look, i was reelected to raise those tax rates on the rich, and you know what those republicans are saying in the house, ali? well, you know what, we were electing not to raise those tax rates. you can get agreement on entitlement reform, raising revenues and do some common sense things to get control over the next ten years. we're not that fa
panel investigating the u.s. consulate attacks in benghazi, libya. some lawmakers are questioning the timing. fox's molly henneberg has the latest. >> reporter: now at he's stepped down as cia director, general david petraeus will not testify this upcoming week at house and senate intelligence committee hearings, investigating the benghazi, libya consulate attack. but some on capitol hill are making it clear, they do want to hear from him in the future. >> i hope we don't have to subpoena a four-star general and former cia director. i hope he would come voluntarily. but if he won't, he will be subpoenaed. >> reporter: petraeus, who had been in charge of the cia since september 2011 has previously told lawmakers the attack was in response to a protest over an antimuslim video. we now know that wasn't true. one gop lawmaker is asking questions about the timing of petraeus' departure. >> it comes days before he's set to testify before the house intelligence committee, and it really begs the question of what did the fbi know and when did they know it? how long did they sit on that inf
television provider. >> now, a discussion on the impact of tuesday's election from the u.s. senate. this is about 45 pence. -- this is about 45 minutes. host: ira shapiro is the author of "the last great senate." he is here to talk to was about the issues facing the senate coming up in the next edition of the senate. welcome to the program. guest: is good to be here. host: tell us a bit about the book. the title, the last great senate. what was it about the folks who were in that senate, the class of '62? who were the big guys in that class and what made them part of the last great senate? guest: i said in the book that america had a great senate from the early 1960's through 1980, a group of people who were focused on the national interests and were in the forefront of every issue facing the country. it is the senate of hubert humphrey, howard baker, robert and ted kennedy, robert dole and many others. they were an unusual group and they were triggered, in my estimation, by their war experience, the need for dealing with the cold war, and a progressive impulse that focused on some
who had worked for a u.s. contractor in iraq and had been essentially abandoned by the company. will she rescued them. will and was trying to find them homes. along for the visit was an unwitting retired dog handler. robin meade understandably couldn't believe the story. >> so how is it that they fall through the cracks and get stranded there? that's unthinkable to me. >> it is unthinkable. that's why spca international are making sure these dogs don't get forgotten and get the brought home. >> reporter: it turns out ivy and nugget were not abandoned. they were donated, taken from their adoptive homes in iraq, a military contractor tells cnn, after terri crisp asked noerm for them. the military contractor reed security told cnn they had no idea crisp would use ivy and nugget as fund-raising tools in the united states. for weeks cnn has been trying to track down crisp. first we were told by her spokespersonor she was unavailable. we drove to terri crisp's rural home down this dirt road in sierra nevada and found crisp driving straight toward us. ms. crisp? it's drew griffin with
have one in my home -- you pay on average with taxes in the u.s., $160. in france, you pay $38 u.s., and you get worldwide calling to 70 countries, not just the u.s. and canada you get worldwide television, not just domestic, and your internet is 20 times faster uploading and ten times faster downloading, and you're paying less than 25 cents on the dollar. all these other countries understand, fundamental principle in the 19th century, canals and railroads were the key to economic growth as industrialization came along and you had to move heavy things like steel. as the 20th century came along it was highways, interstate highway program, for example, and airports that were crucial to economic growth. now it's the information super highway. and what does the industry say? don't call it that. the rest of the world -- >> did they literally say that. >> guest: i was told by the pr person at verizon that was not used anymore. that's the only company that actually has fiberoptic to your home. at&t has fiberoptic down the street but not to your home. but the companies are not wiring the w
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